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    Trade the UK Election

    Find out about the UK election on June 8,
    including how the election could affect the markets,
    election FAQs & LCG’s latest market analysis
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How could markets be impacted by the election?

Parties and Polls

If the polls prove to be correct, Theresa May would sweep into power again with a much larger majority in the House of Commons. The biggest changes to the UK political landscape could be with the other parties.

Conservatives
Leader: Theresa May
Seats in 2015: 331
Polling: 46%
Labour Party
Leader: Jeremy Corbyn
Seats in 2015: 232
Polling: 29%
Liberal Democrats
Leader: Tim Farron
Seats in 2015: 8
Polling: 9%
SNP
Leader: Nicola Sturgeon
Seats in 2015: 56
Polling: N/A
UKIP
Leader: Paul Nuttall
Seats in 2015: 1
Polling: 7%
Greens
Leader: Caroline Lucas, Jonathan Bartley
Seats in 2015: 1
Polling: 3%
Polls Source: The Daily Telegraph, May 5 2017

Election FAQs

Click on the images below to discover more about the UK election
What is a snap election and why was it called?
A snap election is an election called early, ahead of the next fixed-term election. The last election was held in 2015 so the next one was due to take place in March 2020.

It was David Cameron who was elected as Conservative Prime Minister at the last general election but he stepped down after the EU referendum. Theresa May has said that getting elected with a bigger majority in parliament would help strengthen her hand in tough Brexit negotiations with the EU.

With the SNP calling for a second Scottish referendum and the Labour Party in disarray, the timing is opportunistic from May.
When will we know the election result?
Voting takes place on June 8th. Polling stations close at 10pm in the UK. The result usually becomes clear by 3am but exit polls could give an indication as early as midnight – especially if it’s a landslide.
Which policies could impact the markets?
Parties are expected to release manifestos mid-May.

Traditionally the Conservatives are viewed as the most ‘Business-friendly’ party and best for markets. The Conservative Party is based on the principles of lower taxes, less government spending and controlling the national debt. Labour and the Liberal Democrats tend to favour higher taxes on the wealthy and higher spending on public services, attaching less importance to the national debt.
Does this affect the timing of Brexit?
Negotiations with other EU nations are not due to start until June so the election should be over by then.
A snap election is an election called early, ahead of the next fixed-term election. The last election was held in 2015 so the next one was due to take place in March 2020.

It was David Cameron who was elected as Conservative Prime Minister at the last general election but he stepped down after the EU referendum. Theresa May has said that getting elected with a bigger majority in parliament would help strengthen her hand in tough Brexit negotiations with the EU.

With the SNP calling for a second Scottish referendum and the Labour Party in disarray, the timing is opportunistic from May.
Voting takes place on June 8th. Polling stations close at 10pm in the UK. The result usually becomes clear by 3am but exit polls could give an indication as early as midnight – especially if it’s a landslide.
Parties are expected to release manifestos mid-May.

Traditionally the Conservatives are viewed as the most ‘Business-friendly’ party and best for markets. The Conservative Party is based on the principles of lower taxes, less government spending and controlling the national debt. Labour and the Liberal Democrats tend to favour higher taxes on the wealthy and higher spending on public services, attaching less importance to the national debt.
Negotiations with other EU nations are not due to start until June so the election should be over by then.

Britain’s political & economic landscape

So far markets have assumed the election will have a positive influence on UK economic and Brexit policy and reduced political uncertainty

Brexit
A bigger majority could allow Theresa May to soften her approach to Brexit because she would rely less on the support of hard-line EU-sceptics
Economy
Traditionally the Conservatives are viewed as the most ‘Business-friendly’ party and best for the economy and financial markets
Uncertainty
If the current government stays in power, that reduced uncertainty, is typically a good thing for markets

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